“A 10 ton catastrophe on a 60 pound chain”, Nick Cave & The Bad Seeds.

“A 10 ton catastrophe on a 60 pound chain”, Nick Cave & The Bad Seeds.

It was but last month that Nick Cave & The Bad Seeds came out from under the carpets of darkness and into the light with the first composition from forthcoming LP Push The Sky Away in tow. Like a calmative caress to a lingering bag beneath the eye, We No Who U R was an underplayed statement of great intent, and with that a cheerless reawakening of sorts in the most positive sense possible. However there were arguably a few things it was desperately lacking, not least the bedraggled Strad freak-outs of Warren Ellis and the effortlessly expressive rhythms of storied drummer Jim Sclavunos. They had therefore missed a couple tricks in those four minutes, though there’s no such unluck this time around and indeed Jubilee Street is a considerably more accomplished piece, musically speaking. It’s thorough, and impressionistically textured, and thoroughly lavish. Lyrically meanwhile, Cave croons of an avid obsessive equipped with “a little black book”, his name etched into its every leaf; of donning “tie and tails” to push his “wheel of love up Jubilee Street”, Brighton I’d speculate; of “a foetus on a leash”. His is an ever grim seduction; an individual allure, and as he potently croaks its last few words: “I’m flying. Look at me now”, Ellis’ higgledy strings gathering gusto all the while, I’m moved to outstretch an arm in the vain hope of going with him to whatever celestial resting place it is that he may go on to roam. Bereft of both breath and speech, Cave may be swift to confess to not having practised what he did preach though ‘The Bad Seeds are today reaping that which they’ve now sown over a clutch of decades, and are doing so utterly majestically.


Push The Sky Away is to be self-released February 18th.

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