Fest Bests: ATP curated by Deerhunter.

Fest Bests: ATP curated by Deerhunter.

There will, in the none too distant future, come a day when All Tomorrow’s Parties’ beachside shenanigans are no more. Presently, there remain three occasions in which to get deep down (and dirty as a Pontins bedsheet) down Camber Sands before Barry Hogan and Deborah Kee Higgins roll up the roadshow and take ATP to as yet uncharted territories this coming winter. Recent reconfigurations within the company are then to make themselves unmistakably manifest, as the two final weekends in November are to commemorate The End Of An Era. Petitions have been signed in favour of the protraction of such events, and intemperate tears will doubtless be shed this wintertime although these grandest of finales surely ought to instead serve as situations of celebration; last stabs at the debauchery and corporeal destruction the festival has so staunchly embodied for so long now; for peace, love, misunderstanding and pieces of swiftly diminishing mischief.

And ahead of those couple blowouts, we’ve before us an alluring curation from ATP mainstay Bradford Cox and his Deerhunter cronies. With a line up comprising everything from neo-classical maestros (Steve Reich is to guide the London Sinfonietta through Clapping Music and Electric Counterpoint, along with a number of other revered compositional works) to estimable Athens, Georgia tributes to The B-52′s (that’ll be The B-53′s, then); estranged Electrelane originators in the inimitable Verity Susman and New Wave deities Tom Tom Club, it’s a bill which is eclectic as it is enticing. Below are our presupposed standout moments, which you’re cordially invited to have a thorough flick through right around now…

Atlas Sound
Atlas Sound
Who: Bradford Cox’ solo endeavour, under the guise of which he’s able to carry out his avant-garde wont and whimsies uninhibited.
Why: Megalomania and perfectionism can be problematic traits within the context of a more conventional band setup although when working alone, such characteristics merely ensure a work of utmost integrity with artistic ingenuity eternally paramount. We couldn’t recommend you thumb through Atlas Sound highly enough…

the Breeders
the Breeders
Who: Alternative rock titans to have governed the stateside underground for much of the ’90s, Kim and Kelley Deal are this year celebrating the sort of creative resurrection we can but hope ATP is to one day undergo itself as they’ve been industriously revisiting seminal ’93 LP Last Splash in its entirety for a short while now.
Why: The seminality factor is one which, fuelled more often than not by a wholly subjective sentimentality, is banded about all too heedlessly. Nonetheless when it comes to the Breeders’ incontrovertible masterstroke, there rather literally really is no room left for hyperbole as it was then lo-fi mastery made flesh. And the best bit? It debatably sounded better yet live even some twenty years on from its conception at last month’s Primavera Sound

Deerhunter
Deerhunter
Who: Headliners of the festival’s every evening, curators of the weekend, and all-round winners, Cox is to reconvene with Deerhunter for a kind of triptych retrospective sprinkled across the festival nightly.
Why: With their three Primavera Sound showings primarily centred around material from their latest and if not greatest, then a real grower in Monomania, the 4AD vanguardists are to pay maybe romanticised respects to their three best recognised works in CryptogramsMicrocastle, and last but by no means least Halcyon Digest. Why should that be so significant? Well, we’d implore you grasp a rare opportunity to indulge in the whole gamut of talent at Cox and Lockett Pundt’s apparent disposal as one spanning scratchy euphoria (Strange Lights), paranoiac subtlety (Agoraphobia) and aloof intimacy (Helicopter), the duo combine to become a truly singular proposition and one you’d be witless to spurn.

Panda Bear
Panda Bear
Who: Noah Lennox of Animal Collective infamy, whose Tomboy LP of 2011 quite rightly afforded Panda Bear a firmer grip on the proverbial bamboos of mainstream intrigue.
Why: Because, as the hushed whisperings among the shoots may well by now have you believe, AnCo could quite feasibly be facing imminent extinction thus this will become less a tangential endeavour than a full-time hobby for the impeccable melodist. Moreover, there’s a more than remote chance Lennox will deign to air the likes of You Can Count On Me, Surfer’s Hymn, Last Night At The Jetty, Slow Motion and so on, any and/ or all of which would irrefutably bring a sense of the openly epiphanic to the palpably earthly environs of Pontins.

Slasher Flicks
Slasher Flicks
Who: Another cub straying from the Animal Collective clan, Avey Tare unleashes his Slasher Flicks on the UK for a very first time. (If you’re for reasons inexplicable unable to make Deerhunter’s ATP curation and plan on being in London that same weekend, they play The Lexington Friday, 21st June.)
Why: Why not? You’d be hard pushed to negate the pioneering artistic qualities innately located within nigh on all Tare has touched of late, thus although we’ve not even a spurious inkling as to how Slasher Flicks are to sound, we’re impatiently awaiting enlightenment on said front…

And that’s just about that. Well, with that in this case being one final advocation of you getting yourself down to deepest, if (fingers crossed) most lustrous Sussex for the weekend of June 21st–23rd. Further info on the festival can be found here, with ATP’s usual array of ticketing options available for acquisition here. All Desire Lines now lead unwaveringly toward the South Coast…

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